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Beechcraft RU-8D 'SEMINOLE'

Description
Notes: U-8D modified with radar reconnaissance system (2 CREW) .
  Manufacturer:Beechcraft
  Base model:U-8
  Designation:RU-8
  Version:D
  Nickname:SEMINOLE
  Designation System:U.S. Air Force
  Designation Period:1952-Present
  Basic role:Utility
  Modified Mission:Reconnaissance
  See Also:

Specifications

Propulsion

Performance

Examples of this type may be found at
MuseumCityState
United States Army Aviation MuseumOzarkAlabama

RU-8D on display

United States Army Aviation Museum
    


 

Recent comments by our visitors
 J.R.Roloff
 Portland, OR
Hi,

Looking for anyone who would have flown or otherwise served with my Dad, then CWO1 Richard 'Dik' Roloff. This would have been 70-71. He retired in '78 as a CWO4, went on to finish his degree and had a secind career as a high school teacher.

He passed on in 1997. Always spoke fondly about his time in ASA and how much he liked doing SIGINT in the RU-8. Always got a laugh from his stories, especially the had grenade in the Mason jar trick!

If you knew him, Id love to hear from you! Blowtorch999@Gmail.com
11/16/2014 @ 20:21 [ref: 68764]
 J.R.Roloff
 Portland, OR
Hi,

Looking for anyone who would have flown or otherwise served with my Dad, then CWO1 Richard 'Dik' Roloff. This would have been 70-71. He retired in '78 as a CWO4, went on to finish his degree and had a secind career as a high school teacher.

He passed on in 1997. Always spoke fondly about his time in ASA and how much he liked doing SIGINT in the RU-8. Always got a laugh from his stories, especially the had grenade in the Mason jar trick!

If you knew him, Id love to hear from you! Blowtorch999@Gmail.com
11/16/2014 @ 20:19 [ref: 68763]
 Andrew Rodriguez
 Ponte Vedra, FL
Hi all, for any of you who have posted, or will post in the future, please be sure to check out Facebook because there is a page for Veterans of the 138th Aviation Company. As you may know the unit flew the RU-6A, RU-8D, RU-21D, RU-21A, RU-21B, RU-21C and finally, the RC-12G. If you've ever been associated with the 138th or any of her sister companies in the 224th Avn Bn (RR) in Vietnam, or during the cold war with TF 138 and Ordway Grove, or Desert Storm or beyond we'd love to hear from you!

http://www.facebook.com/groups/281639639031/

Also check out:
www.138thavnco.org
10/05/2014 @ 02:43 [ref: 68680]
 Ernie Stokely
 Dallas, TX
I was a field rep for the APQ-86 in Germany from 1961-1963. We maintained a 5th echelon field maintenance shop at Coleman Barracks in Mannheim. There were 3 tech reps who were assigned to the six UR-8D aircraft in Europe at that time, one assigned to each division. Jim Smith and I were the TI reps. Bill McClure was the rep from Ryan Aeronautics that provided the Clifton navigation computer and the Doppler ground track radar. At least one mission was flown along the Czech border at night to detect Soviet tank movement. The RU-8D was equipped with not only the cabin radar equipment, it had a 12 foot long antenna slung below the belly of the aircraft. That antenna was equipped with a gyro-contolled yaw motor that would slew the antenna to maintain a constant orientation as the aircraft yawed. This made for some interesting banging around during rough weather.
01/08/2014 @ 07:59 [ref: 68287]
 Ernie Stokely
 Dallas, TX
I was a field rep for the APQ-86 in Germany from 1961-1963. We maintained a 5th echelon field maintenance shop at Coleman Barracks in Mannheim. There were 3 tech reps who were assigned to the six UR-8D aircraft in Europe at that time, one assigned to each division. Jim Smith and I were the TI reps. Bill McClure was the rep from Ryan Aeronautics that provided the Clifton navigation computer and the Doppler ground track radar. At least one mission was flown along the Czech border at night to detect Soviet tank movement. The RU-8D was equipped with not only the cabin radar equipment, it had a 12 foot long antenna slung below the belly of the aircraft. That antenna was equipped with a gyro-contolled yaw motor that would slew the antenna to maintain a constant orientation as the aircraft yawed. This made for some interesting banging around during rough weather.
01/08/2014 @ 07:58 [ref: 68286]
 Darrell Wells
 , FL
I was a member of the Snoopy Crew of which there is a picture of one of our two RU 8 D's. These planes had no markings because we was not there! My tour at Udorn Thailand was 1970-1971. My mos was 68G20 or airframe repairman. We could ride along on test flights and I actually flew about 20 ft above the Mekong river following its course between Thailand and Laos. Scroll down to the pictures and click on the unpainted or silver one. I worked on this plane at this site. I still have my Snoopy Crew going away mug from when I left Thailand. Would love to hear from other Crew members!!
12/31/2013 @ 03:41 [ref: 68271]
 Ed and Cynthia
 , VA
RU-8D RECOGNITION IN NATIONAL VIGILANCE PARK, FORT MEADE, MD

National Vigilance Park stands to honor those "silent warriors" who risked their lives performing airborne signals intelligence mission during the Cold War. The RU-8D addition to Vigilance Park, dedicated on 12 May 1998, represents Army soldiers who were lost while performing aerial reconnaissance.

The RU-8D at National Vigilance Park is completely restored. The symbol on its tail, the Lonely Ringer, represents the 224th Aviation Battalion. (The wings on the crest represent Army Aviation and what it stands for. The lightning bolts portray the strategic striking capability of the battalion. "Lonely Ringer," the original battalion tactical callsign, signifies the uniqueness of the battalion's classified mission in military history.)

The RU-8D mission equipment is removed from the aircraft and is on permanent display inside the National Cryptologic Museum. Both of these exhibits are a fitting tribute to our vigilant servicemen and women who were lost and to those who continue to serve in this vital mission for our country.
05/27/2013 @ 16:40 [ref: 67842]
 Rebecca Peterson
 Kansas City, MO
Looking for anyone who remembers Phil Padberg - worked on these Beech planes late '68 to spring '69. Installed Heat Sensing radar in the planes. Please contact me if you remember anything. Thanks for keeping the memories alive.
12/03/2012 @ 15:20 [ref: 67372]
 Larry E. Lewter
 Maumelle, AR
I was a RU-8 pilot with the 138th September 1969-Aug 1970 in Danang and helped move the unit Phu Bai. I was assigned to the 138th after arriving in country because I had a Top Secret clearance but not rated in the RU-8. I was made supply officer, which I knew nothing about and it was a learning curve. I was finally rated in the RU-8 and flew about 700 hours. I arrived shortly after the company had moved housing from downtown to Danang Main just inside from Dog Patch. When I arrived I was told that nothing much happened around Danang. A few days later Charlie blew up the place with about 40 rockets. Before moving to Phu Bai we had a detachment there. I was making a midnight run from Danang to Phu Bai and was trapped on the taxi way while Charlie, again, blew up the place. Helpless feeling setting in the middle of an airfield and no place to take cover.

When Kissinger was in the peace talks in Nov. 1972 the ADRF units were shut down. I understand it was an error and Westmoreland wanted them back up and flying. I was home in Texas on leave waiting to go to Europe when branch called and changed my orders. I was to standby until further word came and I was sent to the 146th RR in Can Tho in Dec. 1972. I stayed to the end and helped shut down the unit in Feb. 1973. Memorable events were seeing a shot up Peace Keeping Huey set down with one dead, and one badly wounded pilot if memory is right. I lived across from the Officers Club and the building near it became the compound for the NVA peace keeping folks. Strange to live openly next to "the enemy". I would love to hear from anyone in the 138th or 146th from those time periods.

My flight class was fixed wing 69-9, I would love to connect with anyone in the class. Especially Jim Dent, James Conn, Bob Crow, Mac, Chavez, Pappy or anyone else.

04/20/2010 @ 16:16 [ref: 26047]
 Larry E. Lewter
 Maumelle, AR
I was a RU-8 pilot with the 138th September 1969-Aug 1970 in Danang and helped move the unit Phu Bai. I was assigned to the 138th after arriving in country because I had a Top Secret clearance but not rated in the RU-8. I was made supply officer, which I knew nothing about and it was a learning curve. I was finally rated in the RU-8 and flew about 700 hours. I arrived shortly after the company had moved housing from downtown to Danang Main just inside from Dog Patch. When I arrived I was told that nothing much happened around Danang. A few days later Charlie blew up the place with about 40 rockets. Before moving to Phu Bai we had a detachment there. I was making a midnight run from Danang to Phu Bai and was trapped on the taxi way while Charlie, again, blew up the place. Helpless feeling setting in the middle of an airfield and no place to take cover.

When Kissinger was in the peace talks in Nov. 1972 the ADRF units were shut down. I understand it was an error and Westmoreland wanted them back up and flying. I was home in Texas on leave waiting to go to Europe when branch called and changed my orders. I was to standby until further word came and I was sent to the 146th RR in Can Tho in Dec. 1972. I stayed to the end and helped shut down the unit in Feb. 1973. Memorable events were seeing a shot up Peace Keeping Huey set down with one dead, and one badly wounded pilot if memory is right. I lived across from the Officers Club and the building near it became the compound for the NVA peace keeping folks. Strange to live openly next to "the enemy". I would love to hear from anyone in the 138th or 146th from those time periods.

My flight class was fixed wing 69-9, I would love to connect with anyone in the class. Especially Jim Dent, James Conn, Bob Crow, Mac, Chavez, Pappy or anyone else.

04/20/2010 @ 15:38 [ref: 26046]

 

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