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Douglas C-74 'Globemaster I'

Description
  Manufacturer:Douglas


  Base model:C-74
  Designation:C-74
  Nickname:Globemaster I
  Designation System:U.S. Air Force
  Designation Period:1925-1962
  Basic role:Transport
 
 

Specifications
Not Yet Available

Known serial numbers
42-65402 / 42-65415, 42-65416 / 42-65451


 

Recent comments by our visitors
 Ralph Simonton
 Lancaster, CA
I didn't know the C-74 existed until a B-36 from my outfit, 11th Bomb Wing at Carswell AFB, was stranded at Nouasseur, Morocco, with a bad propeller. It was a priority to get it back in the air, because General Ryan, our division commander, was on board. Another prop man and I loaded one on a Base Flight C-119 and took off for Mobile, Al. There we were transferred to a C-74 for the remainder of the trip. I liked it a lot better than the C-124, in which I flew back and forth to Morocco several times. I guess it didn't have the same cargo capacity, but it was a very nice aircraft. Our flight engineer was an instructor, and he regaled us with his tales of students learning to be flight engineers. I guess the time frame must have been about 1956.
03/01/2014 @ 09:45 [ref: 68383]
 Nicholas M. Williams
 Waverly, IA
I wrote a comprehensive article on the history of the C-74 Globemaster which was published in the Journal of the American Aviation Historical Society in the 1980s. I'll be happy to mail anyone a copy if you will send me your mailing address.
03/04/2010 @ 18:45 [ref: 25819]
 Robert Lasher SMSGT (RET)
 Shelton 98584, WA
The C-74 was never folwn to the Pacific.I was with the squadron from it's enciption until 1950.
07/12/2009 @ 19:54 [ref: 24294]
 Robert Lasher SMSGT (RET)
 Shelton 98584, WA
want to take excepion to the comment (18724). I was stationed at Long Beach Air Base, across the runway from Dougles Aircraft plant when the C-74 was devloped. I was one of 6 selected by, then Maj. Cassidly to form a cadry to form a unit to accept the XC-74 Aircarft,and form a squadron. The first C-74 was A Wood mock-up in the hanger. woorked with the Engineers during this period on the Fligh engineers station.(I was a B-29 flight engineer).
I was the flight engineer when Maj. Cassidy accepeted the first C-74 for the Air Force.And contrary to rumors. I was the flight engineer on the C-74 we returned to Douglas to
use to salvage what they could, to produce the first C-124.

07/12/2009 @ 19:08 [ref: 24293]
 Robert Lasher SMSGT (RET)
 Shelton 98584, WA
want to take excepion to the comment (18724). I was stationed at Long Beach Air Base, across the runway from Dougles Aircraft plant when the C-74 was devloped. I was one of 6 selected by, then Maj. Cassidly to form a cadry to form a unit to accept the XC-74 Aircarft,and form a squadron. The first C-74 was A Wood mock-up in the hanger. woorked with the Engineers during this period on the Fligh engineers station.(I was a B-29 flight engineer).
I was the flight engineer when Maj. Cassidy accepeted the first C-74 for the Air Force.And contrary to rumors. I was the flight engineer on the C-74 we returned to Douglas to
use to salvage what they could, to produce the first C-124.

07/12/2009 @ 19:08 [ref: 24292]
 dgsims
 , MS
Is there a C-74 still in existece anywhere, such as in a museum? I have searched the Wright-Patterson list and don't find it there.
01/22/2009 @ 09:57 [ref: 23530]
 corky c.
 fort lupton, CO
i was asigned to 1629th a. b. squad. at rhein main ger. on 7/11/48 as a mechanic on c-47 & c-54 aircraft.later in the year c74 glogemasters started flying in replasement engines for the c-54's on the berlin/airlift. they came from mobile ala. they made 3 or 4 trips a week. piston engines did not last long on the lift. i was a private first class at the time and the line chief asked me to volunteer for the c-74 crew as they they were all from mobile on tdy and would be going back to the states befor long. when they left, my c.o. lt.col fred o. easley gave me two quick promotions and put me in charge of the crew. i hand picked 7 mechanics who i knew were not afraid of work and we became the crew. we were on duty when ever a c-74 was on the the ground, but had no other duties whatsoever. we had a blocked off section of barracks where we could sleep, undisturbed any time we were off duty. we also had 10 german mechanics that were split on 3 8hr. shifts so we always had 2 or 3 working each shift.
02/21/2008 @ 09:07 [ref: 19736]
 Boeing
 , IL
Beginning in early 1942, Douglas began development of the C-74 Globemaster I. This large four-engine transport would meet the need for an aircraft that could support the demands of a global logistics network with larger payload and transoceanic range. In July of that year, a contract was awarded to Douglas to build 50 of the giant planes. Development took longer than expected, and the first aircraft did not fly until just after the end of the war. By that time the government was canceling or reducing all aircraft production, including the production run of the C-74, which was reduced to just 14 aircraft.

Called Globemaster because of its ability to circumnavigate the world with only two stops, the C-74 was designed for self-sufficiency. A combination of features enabled it to operate anywhere in the world, independent of any transportation network or facilities. Self-contained electrical power enabled the crew to change engines if needed and to load cargo using internal cranes and freight elevators that lifted cargo to and from the ground.

The C-74 featured a laminar-flow wing and full-span fowler flaps. One of its strangest features was the twin bubble canopies. The separate canopies made communication and cooperation between the pilot and co-pilot difficult; a conventional cockpit would later be retrofitted.

During its short career, the C-74 participated in the Berlin Airlift, set a record for being the first aircraft to cross the North Atlantic with more than 100 passengers and was flown at a gross weight of 86 tons -- the most weight for any powered aircraft up to that time. The fifth Globemaster had the distinction of being the prototype for the plane that would replace the C-74: the C-124 Globemaster II.

Specifications First flight: Dec. 5, 1945
Wingspan: 173 feet 3 inches (52.81 m)
Length: 124 feet 2 inches (37.85 m)
Height: 43 feet 9 inches (13.34 m)
Weight (max): 172,000 pounds (39.018 kg)
Speed (max): 328 mph (528 km/h)
Ceiling: 21,000 feet (6,490 m)
Range: 7,250 miles (11,670 km)
Power plant: 3,250 horsepower Pratt & Whitney R-4360-69
Accommodation: 125 troops, 115 stretchers or 48,150 pounds (21,840 kg) of cargo
Copyright 1995 - 2007 Boeing. All Rights Reserved
12/03/2007 @ 10:49 [ref: 18774]
 Kris Knutson
 fromberg, MT
My father flew the C74 in Korea during the war but that was all I really know about his time there would be interested in finding out more about the C74's time in Korea
11/29/2007 @ 11:45 [ref: 18724]
 Austin Brookley
 , FL
Great plane it flew out of my great grandpa's air field brookley field.
11/08/2007 @ 16:13 [ref: 18463]

 

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