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Fairchild C-82A 'Packet'

Description
  Manufacturer:Fairchild
  Base model:C-82
  Designation:C-82
  Version:A
  Nickname:Packet
  Designation System:U.S. Air Force
  Designation Period:1925-1962
  Basic role:Transport

Specifications
  Length: 77' 1" 23.4 m
  Height:26' 6" 8.0 m
  Wingspan: 106' 6" 32.4 m
  Wingarea: 1,400.0 sq ft 130.0 sq m
  Empty Weight: 32,500 lb 14,739 kg
  Gross Weight: 54,000 lb 24,489 kg

Propulsion
  No. of Engines: 2
  Powerplant: Pratt & Whitney R-2800-85
  Horsepower (each): 2100

Performance
  Range: 3,785 miles 6,095 km
  Max Speed: 281 mph 452 km/h 244 kt
  Climb: 950 ft/min 289 m/min
  Ceiling: 21,200 ft 6,461 m

Known serial numbers
44-22951 / 44-23058

Examples of this type may be found at
MuseumCityState
McChord Air MuseumMcChord AFBWashington
Pima Air & Space MuseumTucsonArizona
United States Air Force MuseumWright-PattersonOhio

C-82A on display

United States Air Force Museum
    


 

Recent comments by our visitors
 Gary Daniels
 Millersburg, PA
My mother-in-law died last week, and my wife and I have acquired a collection of photographs. One of the photos shows a man leaning out of the cockpit of an airplane. Using the telephoto adjustment on my phone's camera, I was able to discern that the type of aircraft is a C-82A Packet. The following information appeared on the data plate under the cockpit: US Army serial no. 45-5783, C-82A-65-FA. According to the C-82 website, there was no such serial number, it appears to be missing a digit. Second, there is no production block 65, as far as I can tell. The photo was taken on 5 January 1952 at Fort Richardson, Alaska. Two other things that appear: On the back is a note, "Taken off in a jet." On the front, the photo is signed, "Always Pete." We thought the man in the cockpit might be an uncle of my wife's, but apparently that is not the case.
06/27/2012 @ 15:22 [ref: 62887]
 afhollisteruk@hotmail.com
 , AK
888888888
05/08/2012 @ 19:05 [ref: 56939]
 Bruce Patton
 , CA
My late father was one of the six Engineers sent to Hagerstown by Howard Hughes to do the basic design work for the C-82. They designed it as a basically wood aricraft that Fairchild converted to aluminum.

It was especially interesting for my Father, he had just gotten married and HH paid all the expenses for my mother and father to travel together since it was their honeymoon!

Bruce Patton
11/17/2010 @ 17:18 [ref: 33316]
 H.B.Owens
 Bryan, TX
My first assignment out of flight school (July 1949)
was to the 4th TCS at McChord AFB.We took the C-82's to Elmendorf AFB,Alaska and supported the entire theater from that location.Returning in November of 1949 we started to get our C-54s. I took one of our C-82's to Germany in January,1950 via Goose Bay,BW-1 and Keflavik.Returned via MATS C-121 (Lockheed L-749)
07/30/2010 @ 18:46 [ref: 28434]
 Al Simpkins
 Dunnellon, FL
I was the line maintenace chief in Eschborn Germany in 1944 when the C 82 landed on our steel mat runway after several go arounds due to the green light, "gear down" light did not come on.
They landed safely and the Fairchild
engineers on board asked if I could do a landing gear check to see if there was a problem other than the light not coming on. As I recall (65 years ago) they said it was the second C 82 flying and they were doing a performance flight.
My B 17 jacks were too short to reach the C82 wings so I collected railroad ties nearby and built a platform to put the jacks on with a crane.
This worked, and we jacked the plane up and did a landing gear cycle which worked fine and we determined the problem was wiring or the light itself.
Overall it was a great experience and I still have photos of that day.
I wish they could find one to put in the WW2 museum in New Orleans of which I am a charter member.
Former Sgt. Al Simpkins, Army and US Airforce.

07/10/2010 @ 07:21 [ref: 27126]
 JP TREVOR
 UK, AZ
Hello, Please can someone either text me Simon Becks website address or his email, as my G4 Titanium has gone kaput and cant find his address. My father wrote THE FLIGHT OF THE PHOENIX and I have some material for Simon he\'s been waiuting for.

Many tyhanks.

Best regards.

JP Trevor
www.thinkshapes.com

0044 7941 060 495
06/25/2007 @ 05:41 [ref: 16938]
 brandon siemion
 Ft.Smith, MT
Hello
I am an A&P that had the pleasure to fly on that bird and to maintain her while I worked for Hawkins and
Powers
03/31/2007 @ 17:44 [ref: 16050]
 Roger Wyckoff
 , PA
Sorry about previous note. Apparently you can't send web site addresses and they got elimanated.

Anyone interested in the two "Flight of the Phoenix" movies can search using the following words.

Simon Beck uswarplanes special feature

Ruud Leeuw aviation history
On Ruud's main page, under the first group, "Propliners", click C-119 "Flying Boxcar".

Then click on the second choice. It starts with my name. It also has a link to Simon Beck's site.

Roger Wyckoff
02/01/2007 @ 13:15 [ref: 15372]
 Roger Wyckoff
 , PA
For anyone interested in the two Flight of the Phoenix movies and the aircraft used in making the movies, I can help.

Simon Beck, of New Zealand, has a great site with a Special Feature, Flight of the Phoenix that covers just about everything concerning the filming of the movies.

Simon's favorite movies are the two Phoenix movies and his favorite airplane is the Flying Boxcar.

1965 Version

Aircraft Used Two C-82A Packets

One Marine R4Q-1

One Talmantz Pheonix P-1

One North American O-47A


2004 Version

Aircraft Used One C-119F

Three Marine R4Q-2s

I was a Marine airborne radio operator in VMR-253, at Iwakuni, Japan in 1958 and 1959. I personally flew at least one flight in the R4Q-1 BuNo 126580 that was used to make a non-flying prop in the 1965 version. It had a working engine and Jimmy Stewart taxied it in the movie.

To get all the facts,go to these sites.





Roger Wyckoff











01/27/2007 @ 08:36 [ref: 15316]
 Rae Howry
 Salem, OR
My father flew as a co-pilot for United Hecathorn and was killed in the crash of his C-82 while crop-dusting in Boca Raton, Florida in the late 1950's. I have always been fascinated with this airplane, and have photos of his plane both static during maintenance, and news clipping photos of the aftermath of the crash. It took me years to finally track down the cause of the crash, and then only because of my own tenacity and the advent of the internet. Go figure!
11/14/2006 @ 20:25 [ref: 14739]

 
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