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Goodyear XAO-3G1 'Inflatoplane'

Description
  Manufacturer:Goodyear
  Base model:AO
  Designation:XAO-3
  Version:G1
  Nickname:Inflatoplane
  Designation System:U.S. Air Force
  Designation Period:1956-1962
  Basic role:Airplane, Observation
  Status:Experimental

Specifications
Not Yet Available

Examples of this type may be found at
MuseumCityState
United States Army Aviation MuseumOzarkAlabama


 

Recent comments by our visitors
 Carl Morgan
 , MO
My Dad, Maj Henry L Morgan, was an AF pilot and Liason Officer for the CIA stationed at Bolling AFB in DC and he did some of he early flight tests of this aircraft.
07/17/2010 @ 20:33 [ref: 27153]
 Jim Bowen
 , FL
Here is a new successor to the Goodyear plane.

Woopy-Fly Inflatable Wing Ultralight Aircraft

The Woopy-Fly, a sort of paraglider/trike/ultralight hybrid shown on the world stage at AERO Friedrichshafen this April 2010 in Germany, has a wing that folds for storage like a paraglider because it's inflatable. Currently, it appears the wing itself is only available from distributors in Switzerland, Russia, and Japan. Those wishing to buy the trike (plus wing) can expect a complete kit cost to run about 13,780 Swiss Francs, which currently is about US$12,400 plus the legal disclaimer that releases the manufacturer of liability.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6CvycZux0E&fmt=18
05/24/2010 @ 15:00 [ref: 26504]
 Joseph J. Mitchener
 Colorado Springs, CO
Thinking about powered paragliding. One drawback is the slow flight speed (30-35 mph). An inflatable wing would be stiffer and would require fewer shrouds. This should make it have much less drag. That should allow for faster travel. Like the old Goodyear planes, the engine that drives the prop cud also run an air pump. Anyone know of any outfit or person who has developed/tested such a wing?

04/04/2009 @ 15:07 [ref: 24073]
 Bill Gilbert
 Perth W.A., OTH
I have been trying to find a machine that could build the inflatoplane wing with the drop thread nylon in the shape of naca 0015 or naca 0018.I have studied this inflatoplane been to visit the aircraft have copies of lots of papers on the subject including wind tunnel test and believe the aircraft would be a great hit. I would like to build them but need to get in touch with a textile engineer to complete the wing, can anybody help or does any one now or a better way of manufacturing the wing.Please call captbillgilbert007 on skype or captbillgilbert@hotmail.com
04/03/2009 @ 23:10 [ref: 24071]
 Bill Gilbert
 Perth W.A., OTH
I have been trying to find a machine that could build the inflatoplane wing with the drop thread nylon in the shape of naca 0015 or naca 0018.I have studied this inflatoplane been to visit the aircraft have copies of lots of papers on the subject including wind tunnel test and believe the aircraft would be a great hit. I would like to build them but need to get in touch with a textile engineer to complete the wing, can anybody help or does any one now or a better way of manufacturing the wing.Please call captbillgilbert007 on skype or captbillgilbert@hotmail.com
04/03/2009 @ 23:10 [ref: 24070]
 Tony Harding
 Rittman, OH
Interesting reading.
Would Harold Hight who posted here on 04/05/2007 please contact me at tonyh_akron@hotmail.com.
04/18/2007 @ 05:05 [ref: 16218]
 Harold Hight
 Munroe Falls, OH
My father was involved in the inflatoplane project and I still have his salesman's notebook with lots of 8 x 10 glossy photos and specs on the later GA 468 (single) and GA 466 (two place). According to a 1991 Loral company newsletter, of the 12 built between 1955 & 1959 3 were sent to museums for display and a 4th was requested by the Army Aviation Museum. My father told me story that a fellow in Mass.? bought several at an army surplus store/auction and would not let Goodyear buy them back years later. Who knows?! You should post some of the later pictures. The XAO 3G1 looks pretty crude to me compared to the later models.
04/05/2007 @ 03:55 [ref: 16098]
 John Smith
 , NC
We have lost over two dozen men in the V-22 and we persist in wanting to field it to create more dead alleged "heroes". The USMC is good for fielding flying deathtraps re: the Corsair and today's Harrier.

In the inflatoplane, we have a sound concept that only gets better with material and general aviation technologies. Add a recovery parachute (RP) and if for whatever reason you ain't happy with how the inflatoplane is flying, you come down by a ballistically deployed parachute.

Another important possible inflatoplane application would be by SEAL teams deploying from submarines since they already use inflatible boats but this would enable them to insert/extract faster/farther but still from below the horizon under radar.

www.combatreform2.com/submarineaircraftcarriers.htm
01/01/2007 @ 22:36 [ref: 15062]
 Thomas Callihan
 , PA
Last I knew the museum at Patuxent NAS had one .
08/02/2006 @ 04:32 [ref: 13781]
 Mike French
 , RI
Does anybody remember plans for an ultralight inflatable aircraft that was to be used as a rescue aircraft for dowmed pilots.I believe it was designed by Goodyear.
07/10/2006 @ 08:39 [ref: 13697]

 
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