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Martin PBM-5 'Mariner'

Description
  Manufacturer:Martin


  Base model:PBM
  Designation:PBM
  Version:-5
  Nickname:Mariner
  Designation System:U.S. Navy / Marines
  Designation Period:1935-1962
  Basic role:Patrol Bomber
 

Specifications
Not Yet Available

Known serial numbers
45405 / 45444, 84590 / 84789, 85136 / 85160, 98617 / 99073, 102276 / 102575


 

Recent comments by our visitors
 George Ciarrocchi
 Philadelphia, PA
Just looking to see if anyone is still around that was involved with the Iwa Jima invasion with the PBM-5s of VPB-19.
My dad wrote a small letter in his log book about it. doing recco and downing a Japanese Sub. My dad's name was Rocco or Rocky.
He said it was the first time a sea plane was used to that extreme because Japan had destroyed all the major air strips that land planes could be used.
E Mail me at gciarr@gmail.com

thanks
11/19/2013 @ 04:11 [ref: 68170]
 Frank Duffek
 endicott, NY
IWAS STATIONED IN SUBIC BAY IN THE YEAR OF 1946
WE FLEW THE SEAPLANE PBM5A ALMOST EVERY DAY ON
TRAINING MISSIONES GUNERRY SEARCH FOR SUBS NIGHT
FLIGHTS INSTURMENTS LANDINGS AND EVERY THING ELSE.
MOVED ON TO OAHU HAWII KANEOHE BAY STATIONED WITH
THE BEST OF THE BEST OF MEN<<> THE PBM5A WAS VERY
SAFE PLANE WE EVEN FLEW IT WITH ONE ENGINE THAN I
MOVED ON TO CORPUS CHRISTIE TEXAS WERE WE DID A LOT
OF FLIGHT TRAINING LEFT THE NAVY WITH THE RANK OF
AVIATION MACHINEST FLIGHT ENGINEER SECOND CLASS
IF ANY ONE KNOWS THIS SAILOR GET IN TOUCH<<<<<
474 BEAN HILL ROAD
ENDICOTT N.Y.13760

12/31/2011 @ 08:46 [ref: 51762]
 Donald C Courtney
 Farmington Hills, MI
I was a radio operator with VP731 on both the PBM5 and the PBM5S. I flew from 1950 until December of 1952 during the Korean conflict. We had the PBM5 on my first tour of duty and the PBM5S for our second tour. On the PBM5S they removed the deck turret that had two 50 caliper machine guns and replaced it with a wing mounted search light. They also replaced the radar that had a 360 degree scan with one that could only scan in the forward direction. I don't know whose brilliant ideas they were, but I would much rather of had a radar that allowed me to see all around the airplane and two additional machine guns than a search light especially when flying patrols along the Korean and Chinese coastlines.
04/12/2011 @ 12:30 [ref: 37224]
 Kris DiGiovanni
 , FL
Did anyone fly with or know Dean F Schultz? He served on a PBM-5a in Korea in 1953.
03/07/2010 @ 09:46 [ref: 25840]
 NANCY HALBERN
 FARMINGTON, UT
THIS NOTE IS FOR BRUCE BARTH- HI BRUCE- I TRIED TO CALL YOU AND YOU OF COURSE ARE UNLISTED.
I TRIED YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS WITHOUT SUCCESS SO HERE I AM TRYING TO REACH YOU.
THIS IS ABOUT MY FATHER, ELI SCHWARTZ, WHO FLEW PBMS DURING WW11.
YOU CALLED ME ON CHRISTMAS EVE, AND I WAS SO THRILLED ABOUT YOUR CALL. I HAVE THOUGHT ABOUT YOU QUITE OFTEN SINCE.
THANK YOU FOR TAKING THE TIME OUT OF YOUR SCHEDULE TO DO THIS.
BRUCE IF YOU ARE NOT ABLE TO FIND ANYONE WHO FLEW IN MY FATHER'S SQUADRON 210, I WANT YOU TO KNOW JUST HOW MUCH I DO APPRECIATE YOUR EFFORT.
THANK YOU-
SINCERELY, NANCY SCHWARTZ HALBERN
02/04/2010 @ 07:30 [ref: 25679]
 Nancy Schwartz Halbern
 Farmington, UT
I am so thrilled to find this sight. My father flew PBM'S and PBY'S during and after WW11. His name is Eli Schwartz.
I have been looking for someone who knows him or flew with him.
I have his log books and all the information covering from 1942-1949.
My father was a test pilot in San Diego after the war until he became ill.
My father died from a brain tumor when I was almost 2 yrs old and my sister was 3 yrs old. (March 2 1952)
I know he must have had some treasured memories in the Navy and along with those memories were those friends he made.
My mother Caroline is no longer living and he was the love of her life.
I am hoping to hear from anyone of you who knew and flew with my father.
Thank you,
Nancy S Halbern
12/22/2009 @ 06:09 [ref: 25456]
 Clark Slayman
 winter park, FL
I flew the PBMS in 1943 with VP208, based in Key West and operated in anti-submarine patrols and convoy duty throughout the Atlantic. In early 1944 became PPC and transferred to VP, later VPB26 and operated through the central and Northern Pacific from Eniwetok thru to Okinawa.My older brother, the "Judge", was a PPC and was with VP 21 in the Atlantic and VPB212 through the southern Pacific. A wonderfully rugged aircraft because we operated from extremely rough water, including the open sea.
02/20/2009 @ 13:57 [ref: 23777]
 Stewart De Witt
 Georgewtown, TX
Correction. Our twelve planes were not PBM-5A, The A indicates they were amphibious. Ours were not.
02/12/2009 @ 04:08 [ref: 23704]
 Stewart De Witt
 georgetown, TX
I was on my last flight in a PBM when we flew from Kaneohe to Alameda in April 1946.It is possible I could have been on a plane with Edwin Meyer's father. If he was on that plane he surely would remember the flight. It took 19 hours and we ran out of fuel exactly when we were tying up to a buoy in Alameda Bay. I was not a member of the crew. I had been given orders to separate from the Squadron and head on home.Rather than take a ship I hitch a ride with a friend of mine---Red Livingston. He was a member (one of three pilots)of a crew that was flying a PBM back to the States where it was to be scrapped. The weather was really bad and we had to fly through two fronts.We could not fly over the cumulonimbus thunderheads, so we had to go around them. I helped navigate by shooting stars for the first time since I had done it in Pensacola. The old plane leaked like hell when we went though heavy rains.We had tried to carry as much fuel as possible when we started but it took three tries to get off the water. The "slide rule" that Bruce Bart referred to on these pages did not work well or was misused.By the time we got off the water we had used 200 gallons of gasoline.

I was in Squadron VP-32 stationed in Saipan- Tanapeg Bay from about October 1945 to March 1946. In March we were ordered to go to Kwajalien (Ebye). We flew scientist to Bikini to study currents in the atoll to prepare for the A bomb test in May.We had twelve planes with three pilots and eight crewmen to each plane. The planes were PBM-5A with the latest Loran equipment. Near the end of April the squadron was ordered to Kaneohe for (I'm told) to have the planes equipped with Geiger counters. I was separated from my squadron then and started the voyage home.
02/10/2009 @ 15:01 [ref: 23688]
 Jerry Kent
 Shelton, WA
I was with FASRON-110 San Diego From boot camp 1-1948 until I was sent to Alameda to join VP-47 in 1-1951 and we (ground crew) shipped out on a VERY long (6 weeks) cruise to Sangley Point P.I. on an OLD troop ship named the General D. Altman. I spent a month on a seapane tender at Okinawa. A few days after I was transported to Okinawa
that same plane lost an engine while on night patrol in the Formosa Straits it and was able to limp into Hong Kong harbor, the next day on take off after repair the plane crashed with 4 of the crew perishing.
I left the Navy that Oct.1952 as an AE2

10/17/2008 @ 10:38 [ref: 22873]

 
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