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North American T-39A 'Sabreliner'

Description
Notes: Sweptback, Low-Wing, jet powered trainer. Engines are mounted on pylons on aft fuselage (2 CREW, 4 PASSENGERS) .
  Manufacturer:North American
  Base model:T-39
  Designation:T-39
  Version:A
  Nickname:Sabreliner
  Designation System:U.S. Air Force
  Designation Period:1948-Present
  Basic role:Trainer
  See Also:

Specifications
Not Yet Available

Known serial numbers
60-3478 / 60-3508, 61-0634 / 61-0685, 62-4448 / 62-4502

Examples of this type may be found at
MuseumCityState
United States Air Force MuseumWright-PattersonOhio
United States Army Aviation MuseumOzarkAlabama

T-39A on display

United States Army Aviation Museum
    


 

Recent comments by our visitors
 Bob Johnson
 Fort Mill,, SC
After assignment with 57th FIS at "sunny Kef-by-the-sea, was next assigned to AAFB, MD with 1003rd OMS, equipped with T-39's. Arrived in Sept '65. After being trained by Jim Nally, I was assigned s/n 62-4488. At Andrews, we were assigned the mission of flying all general officers, senators, congressmen and other high ranking civilians around the US, Canada, Caribbean and some even went south to C.A. I had gone thru chamber while with 48th FIS at LAFB, and was flight qualified. All aircraft flights with VIP's had to have FM on board unless it was local training. Had to maintain and fly. Worked many 12-24 hour days.CMSGT Schere was always on my butt about getting a haircut, said I should find a barber open on Sunday. Told him my hair grew on AF time, that I would get it cut on AF time.
I flew nearly 1,200 hours in nearly 2 years. Before leaving was crewing two Sabres and had 2-3 helpers. Often after landing, had to take-off again on another trip, piolots and pax waiting. We had about 15 assigned TWA's, and only 10 or so flight qual. FM's. Cong. L. Mendel Rivers was one of my frequent pax. He was from SC. Me from PGH. When I told him I was marrying girl from NC, he got her a job working for Architect of US Capital. Remember Capt. Kerr, one of the highest time Sabre drivers. Lots of overnights just about everywhere in US. Lots of mostly good people & times.
Got my start in corporate aircraft maintenance after 8 yrs in AF. Wound up as Aircrfat Maint. Mgr. for several Fortune 500 companies, all 30 + yrs. on Falcon 20, F-200, F-50, F-900 & F2000, with some B-200/300 & C-650's & other a/c.
01/23/2014 @ 18:39 [ref: 68315]
 David Donatto SMSgt ret
 Cripple Creek, CO
Col Orth's comments sure brought back some wonderful memories of that trip from Weisbaden to Yokota. We took off on 6 Jul 75 and landed in Yokota 12 Jul 75. We logged 14 sorties and logged 33.6 hours. Being a young A1C, I sure shared a great adventure with this crew. I was also the maintainer on 476. The T-39 was a great little bird.
04/03/2012 @ 19:18 [ref: 54736]
 Don Orth Lt Col ret
 Athol, ID
Also piloted the T-39A with the 1868th FCS in Wiesbaden AB and Rhein Main AB, GE from 1973 to 1977. Great aircraft, fun to fly and a really great squadron to be a part of. We had two T-39A assigned but in 1975 the Communications Command decided to give one away to our sister squadron in Yakota Japan. Capt Bill Blair, myself, MSgt Bob Nord and A1C Dave Donnato flew the bird from Rhein Main AB, GE to Yakota AB, Japan. May have been the longest flight of a T-39 on record as we went via Spain, Italy, Greece, Turkey, Iran, Packistan, two stops in India, Thailand. Singapore, Bruni, Philippines and finally to Yakota.

02/27/2012 @ 15:22 [ref: 53402]
 Don Orth Lt Col ret
 Athol, ID
Also piloted the T-39A with the 1868th FCS in Wiesbaden AB and Rhein Main AB, GE from 1973 to 1977. Great aircraft, fun to fly and a really great squadron to be a part of. We had two T-39A assigned but in 1975 the Communications Command decided to give one away to our sister squadron in Yakota Japan. Capt Bill Blair, myself, MSgt Bob Nord and A1C Dave Donnato flew the bird from Rhein Main AB, GE to Yakota AB, Japan. May have been the longest flight of a T-39 on record as we went via Spain, Italy, Greece, Turkey, Iran, Packistan, two stops in India, Thailand. Singapore, Bruni, Philippines and finally to Yakota.

02/27/2012 @ 15:19 [ref: 53401]
 Bo b Beil
 , VA
Crewed T-39 tail number 4495 at Langley AFB from 1976-1979. Was a great bird and great group of folks to work with in the unit.
11/15/2011 @ 14:07 [ref: 50226]
 Carol pedersen (Eberflus)
 , CO
I would like to say, thank you to all of you for keeping the memory of my father alive Robert Eberflus. He loved those airplanes!! I had the opportunity to visit the museum in California to see the t-39 and it brought back many memories of my dad. Thank you for all the kind words of all that knew my dad. Carol pedersen ( Eberflus)
10/29/2011 @ 06:36 [ref: 49865]
 Tony Janicki
 , MA
I was stationed at Langley from 1981 -1985 as a crew chief on the CT-39A. S/N 3507. I later was asst Crew Chief on s/n 4496 with Bob Eberflus. R.I.P. Bob ! You are a great person and a great mentor !
10/16/2011 @ 13:26 [ref: 49589]
 Andre Everett
 Fairveiw Heights, IL
My 1st assignemnt was to Langey AFB Va, and I too was a crew cheif on T39's.. My jst was 3483. Iwas at Langey when on of our jets 4496 TAC commander Gen O'Malley and crew crashed and all on board die. The best Crew Cheif I've even knew Bob Eberflus (not sure on the spell) lost his life too. Great jest to work on. RIP Bob
06/13/2011 @ 11:00 [ref: 39476]
 Bob
 Shreveport, LA
I flew the T-39A beginning in 1967, eventually becoming IP and Flight examiner. It was a fine trainer and proficiency airplane, but poorly equipped to be a staff transport, which comprised the bulk of our missions. It had no autopilot, no weather radar, flight director instrumentation only on the pilot's side, and (originally) only one two-way radio, an ARC-34 (I think) UHF of bad design, which would fail totally and immediately if you followed the wrong sequence for changing frequencies. One pilot hand-flew and kept a sharp lookout for traffic, while the other did the bookkeeping and communications. A 7- or 9-hour day of this was not enjoyable. Terrific little bird for training flights around the flagpole, as I said, but radar, autopilot, and "sweep-on" emergency oxygen masks would have made it great across the entire spectrum of missions. I've often wondered whether the CT-39's of MAC addressed these shortcomings.
06/08/2011 @ 10:20 [ref: 39208]
 Dave Bragg
 , VA
I used to work on T-39, 3489 with Mike Moody. Hi Mike. I also worked on 636. I recently saw 636 in the boneyard at DM. I have heard that 3489 is supposed to be on static display at a university in Texas, but haven't been able to track it down. I always liked the T-39 since it was the first jet I worked on. But my favorite has to be the A-10, worked on those for 11 years.
05/20/2011 @ 11:22 [ref: 38152]

 

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