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Northrop F-15A 'Reporter'

Description
Notes: Air superiority fighter with fixed wing and tricycle landing gear. Turbofan engines mounted in the aft fuselage section (1 CREW) .
  Manufacturer:Northrop
  Base model:F-15
  Designation:F-15
  Version:A
  Nickname:Reporter
  Designation System:U.S. Air Force
  Designation Period:1930-1947
  Basic role:Photographic

Specifications
Not Yet Available


 

Recent comments by our visitors
 Donald R Deal Sr.
 Welcome, NC
My dad Marvin D Deal, was in the Army Air Corp then it became the US Air Force. I do not know for sure but at his age now (86) says he things he was in from 1946 to 1950. He was used as a Photographer in the VV 8th PRS (Photo Recon Squadron, he states he was with the 558th and was stationed at Johnson Air Base in Japan flying missions that included Vladivostok Russia, Korea, Vietnam and Borneo in a F15A Reporter. He further states that his superior collected his and the pilots Dog tags before the flight and anything that could ID them and were told if your caught...we don't know you. He also told me that when he exited the dark room two men in suits were there to take the roll of film from him who were with the OSS. I truly wish I could find a more detailed history of his unit.
11/06/2014 @ 11:37 [ref: 68745]
 Norm Gillespie
 Ajijic, Jalisco Mexico not really T, TX

In 1947 and 1948, I was in the Army Air Corp stationed at what was then known as Johnson Field a few miles west of Tokyo, Japan.
In addition to three P-51 squadrons. we had a squadron of F-15As that we thought were busy photographing Korea. The F-15As made a loud screeching sound when they flew over in preparation for landing. The noise was probably due to some vertical reeds protruding in the engine air intake. I never knew why those reeds were there unless it was just to notify anyone within earshot that they were in the air.
I would appreciate any more information about that squadron in those days.
After many years in Mass, Illinois and California, in 1999 we moved to the middle of Mexico on the north shore of Lake Chapala where we have wonderful weather all year round and we are 45 minutes from an international airport so we can go anywhere in the world from here..


Norm Gillespie
12/29/2007 @ 13:59 [ref: 19083]
 Norm Gillespie
 Ajijic, Jalisco Mexico not really T, TX

In 1947 and 1948, I was in the Army Air Corp stationed at what was then known as Johnson Field a few miles west of Tokyo, Japan.
In addition to three P-51 squadrons. we had a squadron of F-15As that we thought were busy photographing Korea. The F-15As made a loud screeching sound when they flew over in preparation for landing. The noise was probably due to some vertical reeds protruding in the engine air intake. I never knew why those reeds were there unless it was just to notify anyone within earshot that they were in the air.
I would appreciate any more information about that squadron in those days.
After many years in Mass, Illinois and California, in 1999 we moved to the middle of Mexico on the north shore of Lake Chapala where we have wonderful weather all year round and we are 45 minutes from an international airport so we can go anywhere in the world from here..


Norm Gillespie
12/29/2007 @ 13:58 [ref: 19082]
 Jeff Kolln
 Yelm, WA
If anyone is interested I am doing a book on the P-61/F-15 for Specialty Press. Has to be in by Jan/08. Love to hear from anyone associate with them.
06/30/2007 @ 12:49 [ref: 16993]
 clancy willis
 richmond, VA
Yes there was an F-15. The 8th Photo recon squadron had most of the 36 that were built. WE couldn't get parts. We refered to them as screaming s--- houses, because of their super chargers. Those R-2800 engines could be heard for miles. We mapped the Batam Death march route, Korea and most of the far east. The 8th Photo Recon. Squadron returned to the states as a unit.
11/21/2006 @ 18:35 [ref: 14808]
 Max Alexander
 Bloomingburg, OH
The P-61E was concieved as a long range escort for the invasion of Japan, but was beat out by the P-82 twin mustang. The 61 retained the 4 20MM canon, the radar dish was removed from the nose and replaced by 50cal. machine guns.The canopy was the longest ever produced at that time, something on the order of 13Feet. Since it was not accepted as a fighter it was further modified in that the guns were removed and photographic equipment was installed in the nose section. If I rember right there were aproximately 32 of the now renamed F-15 Recorder aircraft built to serve as photo aircraft. These aircraft were the first to photograph Korean teratory as the war ran to the close.
07/15/2005 @ 11:52 [ref: 10762]
 Michael J. Runkle
 , TN
Boy, is THIS website out in left field! An F-15A Reporter - air superiority fighter? Turbofan engines???? 1 crew?
06/13/2005 @ 16:54 [ref: 10470]
 Don Sproule
 , KY
I think the notes about the aft mounted turbo-fan is ref to the A-9, which lost out to the A-10.
07/30/2004 @ 00:11 [ref: 7938]
 Don Sproule
 Lexington, KY
The F-15 had a crew of two, and was a mod of the two XP-61E's, which were long range escort fighters built to the same USAAF specs as the P-82. The '61E and the F-15 shared the same basic center pod, i.e. a slim, two place, bubble canopy, but other than that, they were P-61's. The 61E had the 20mm cannon removed from the belly, and had 4 .50's in the nose. The two E's had two different arrangements of the guns, one had them staggered, the other's were straight. I had the privilege of climbing all over the last F-15 at Fresno, Cal. in 1968. It was being used as a Borate bomber by ( I believe) Cal-Nat Airways. It crashed and burned a couple of months later while fighting a forest fire near Hollister, Cal. There is a P-61 at the Mid-Atlantic Air Museum near Reading, Pa., that they pulled off a mountain in New Guinea a few years ago, and they hope to restore it to flying, I sure hope so. I love the sound of round engines, especially if they say Pratt Whiskey up front. I have a lot of hours behind Pratts, and the R-2800 is the finest large round engine ever built, bar none. The best kept secret in Kentucky is that we have an aviation museum here in Lexington. "aviationky.org" Anyone else out there as much a P-61/F-15 freak as I am, give me a holler. (no, I am not a native Kentuckian, I was born and raised in Imperial Valley, Calif. Don Sproule donsprl@aol.com
07/29/2004 @ 23:56 [ref: 7937]
 Bogdan ATAMAN
 Warsaw, OTH
Aircraft with serial number 43-8335 on it's tail is the Norhtrop XF-15 A Reporter.

Greetings from Poland
Bogdan
04/25/2004 @ 10:34 [ref: 7289]

 

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