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Beech SNB-5 (TC-45J) 'Navigator'

Description
  Manufacturer:Beech
  Base model:SNB
  Designation:SNB
  Version:-5
  Nickname:Navigator
  Designation System:U.S. Navy / Marines
  Designation Period:1939-1948
  Basic role:Scout trainer
  See Also:C-45

Specifications
  Length: 35' 12" 10.9 m
  Height:9' 4" 2.8 m
  Wingspan: 49' 8" 15.1 m
  Wingarea: 360.7 sq ft 33.5 sq m
  Empty Weight: 5,680 lb 2,575 kg
  Max Weight: 9,900 lb 4,489 kg

Propulsion
  No. of Engines: 2
  Powerplant: Pratt & Whitney R-985-AN-3
  Horsepower (each): 450

Performance
  Range: 1,626 miles 2,618 km
  Cruise Speed: 207 mph 333 km/h 180 kt
  Max Speed: 234 mph 376 km/h 203 kt
  Climb: 1,490 ft/min 454 m/min
  Ceiling: 23,300 ft 7,101 m

Examples of this type may be found at
MuseumCityState
The Air Museum "Planes of Fame"ChinoCalifornia

TC-45J on display

The Air Museum "Planes of Fame"
    


 

Recent comments by our visitors
 Jim Strickland
 Omaha, NE
I entered Flight Training in 1960. NAVCAD/ MARCAD Class 11-60. I flew the T-34's, T-28's, SNB-5's, HTL-6's and HUP-2's. Winged in November, 1961. Flew the SNB's at Whiting for Instrument Rating b/4 heading to Ellyson Field for Helicopter Training in HT-8. Myself, another Student, and an Instructor took a final Instrument hop from Whiting to Boise, Idaho and back! Over Kansas, I was at the controls during a major thunderstorm, and as we flew through the terrible buffeting, my aerial map,with all of my plotting info, was sucked out of my lap and through a slight opening I had made in the small sliding window to my left. Since we were over croplands, I've often wondered about the reaction of whoever found the Navigational Chart with all of the plotting information! First and last time I was on an A/C, in a storm, that was twisted 90 degrees from it's line of flight by the turbulence and wind shear. I also, would never have believed that an A/C that small could take the beating we did in that storm. It was one heck of a sturdy little Twin Engined A/C, and required staying on the controls. In good weather though, it trimmed up pretty well and gave it's pilot a break! Great Memories!!
03/29/2012 @ 07:56 [ref: 54556]
 R. Elledge or R.J. Elledge
 , CA
Reference to person seeking more information reagrding Raymond Elledge, or J. Elledge. I may be reached at oceanman1@yahoo.com
12/31/2010 @ 10:45 [ref: 35117]
 Jack Bemenderfer
 DuPont, WA
When I graduated from AMS "A" school in May of 1958 at NATTC, Memphis, TN. I was assigned to Basic Training Group Seven (BTG-7) at the Naval Air Station on the North side of the base. We flew SNBs, T-1As, and T-28Bs providing navigation training for NavCads. We had a lot of SNBs. Occasionally I was assigned to work on them. It was fun, because they had fabric covered flight controls and I got to use my training in repairing them. We also received a half-set of flight pay in some months and got our flight time in the SNB.

In 1959 we began transitioning out of the T-1As and into the T2J-1s (T-2A). It was a treat to work on them and not the old T-28s and SNBs that leaked engine oil all over your dungarees.

Jack Bemenderfer CWO-3 USN (Ret.)
12/02/2009 @ 14:16 [ref: 25374]
 Sandy Lovell
 Fredericksburg, VA
To: WxBY ORL/MCO, HI

My email address is hooshur1@aol.com. Thank you for sharing your story. I am glad I found it.
03/16/2008 @ 10:27 [ref: 20042]
 Sandy Lovell
 Fredericksburg, VA
WxBY
ORL/MCO, HI

I was looking around for information on my dad and you mentioned his name and my mother's - Earl Lovell (spouse - Alda). Can you contact me at my email address and tell me everything you can remember about his work life. A huge thank you by a loving daughter!
03/16/2008 @ 10:11 [ref: 20041]
 TERRY SMALLWOOD
 RIVERDALE, GA
I SAW THAT MR. BOB HANSEN WAS AT DOUGLAS GA. SO WAS MY DAD JOSEPH MAXWELL SMALLWOOD, HE WAS A FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR THERE. I WAS HOPING MR HANSEN MIGHT HAVE HEARD OF HIM THERE.AFTER THE WAR MY DAD ALSO WORKED FOR AERO CORP. IN ATLANTA, AND LATER RETIRED FROM AVIATION SUPPLY CORP. IN ATLANTA. HE WAS CONSIDERED TO BE ONE OF THE BEST PILOTS AT ATLANTA AIRPORT.I CONSIDERED HIM TO BE ONE OF THE BEST FATHERS.
01/12/2008 @ 18:42 [ref: 19272]
 Bob Hansen
 Greenwood, IN
In early 1944 I was stationed at Douglas Army Air Field at Douglas,Arizona. This was advanced training for the Army Air Force. We flew AT17's and AT9's. I spent all my hours in the AT17 (Bamboo Bomber). Compared to the AT9 it was like flying a kite.
07/17/2007 @ 13:01 [ref: 17157]
 John Elledge
 , CA
My father known either as Raymond or John Elledge, USMC, per his Log Book, November 1961, flew this plane. He was probably rank of Capt-Maj by this time. Maybe Cherry Point, Quantico,El Toro, Pennsocola

Looking for anybody who may of known him?
03/17/2007 @ 19:05 [ref: 15927]
 WxBY -- addenda
 ORL/MCO, FL
.......follow-up on the 'bamboo bomber' reference........

Cessna T-50 (civil) -- AT-17 "Bobcat" (military)

C. 1939 and, it did have extensive wood in the airframe -- spruce, mostly, lotsa plywood......fabric covered.........
02/02/2007 @ 09:43 [ref: 15385]
 WxBY
 ORL/MCO, HI
It is amazing that more folks haven't responded here about the double-breasted bug-crusher!

MANY! Naval Aviators had instrument training in this venerable ol' beast while in the Pensacola area. If I remember correctly, they were based at Forest Sherman Field as part of METG -- multi-engine training group.

I don't have my log books handy but I believe we learned to fly at Saufley Field, in the Beech T-34B, went out to Whiting Field for mucho fun-flying in the North American
T-28B and C's.....formation, night flying, cross-countries (day VFR), very elemental gunnery and.......carrier quals!

From Whiting Field, we moved our residence back to Main Side and began training in the SNB, out at Forest Sherman.
My co-pilot was another NavCad, Kirk Stubbs, and our (superb!) instructor was a USMC Captain by the name of Earl Lovell (spouse Alda).

"Solo' in the SNB was two student pilots going up in the ol' crates without an instructor also on board. On Kirk's and my first solo hop, we had wandered around the PNS area for a few minutes when the tower transmitted an immediate 'Weather Recall' -- all aircraft return to their respective bases ASAP due to foul weather forming up. Before Kirk and I got even close to getting back to home-plate, the weather troughout the panhandle of Florida had turned to shit.

We were in a bit of a bind, even worse than we knew at the time. Fortunately, Capt. Lovell was up in another aircraft and heard the radio chatter so he came up on the air.

He told us to listen closely to the instructions we were going to receive from tha ground and follow them as precisely as possible. He then got us set up for a GCA, of which Kirk and I knew absolutely nothing about! We had previously had NO training or even ground school about the procedure!

The guys on the ground knew they/we had a situation with two very green student pilots up there, but they talked us down, never letting on how serious the ops had become. We were zero/zero, PURE IFR (even though we did not have any real idea of all that that entailed). They talked us down and we greased the ol' tail-dragger onto the strip about 300 feet past the numbers.......... Sure as hell made a believer out of me as far as instrument flying was concerned.

Up to this point, we were still in 'basic/primary' training.

From the SNB and basic training, we went our separate ways to advanced training. I went out north of PNS to Ellyson Field for helicopter training.

Incidentally, I think the nickname 'Bamboo Bomber' was more aptly applied to an earlier Cessna twin-engine trainer.
01/03/2007 @ 01:18 [ref: 15077]

 
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