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Fairchild R4Q-2 (C-119F) 'Flying Boxcar'

Description
  Manufacturer:Fairchild
  Base model:R4Q
  Designation:R4Q
  Version:-2
  Nickname:Flying Boxcar
  Equivalent to: C-119F
  Designation System:U.S. Navy / Marines
  Designation Period:1931-1962
  Basic role:Transport
  See Also:

Specifications
Not Yet Available

Known serial numbers
51-2586, 51-2668 / 51-2686, 51-2687 / 51-2689, 51-7968 / 51-8052, 51-8098 / 51-8168, 51-8169 / 51-8232

Examples of this type may be found at
MuseumCityState
Hill Aerospace MuseumHill AFBUtah
March Field Air MuseumRiversideCalifornia
McClellan Aviation MuseumMcClellan AFBCalifornia
Mid-Atlantic Air MuseumReadingPennsylvania

C-119F on display

Hill Aerospace Museum

McClellan Aviation Museum

Mid-Atlantic Air Museum
  


 

Recent comments by our visitors
 Hugo Armand Ruiz
 Harrison, NY
I served at Cherry Point, NC, in VMR 252 from 1951 to 1954 as a radio operator. We lost one of ours in 1953 with 42 University of Oklahoma ROTC student who completed summer training in Corpus Christi. We stopped for fuel at Whiting field, FL. Our full squadron was on the lift. The take off was in the evening and one of ours went in just beyond the end of the runway, clipping trees and crashing killing all 42 students and four of five crew. The survivor was Jerry Tuttle from upstate NY who broke both ankles but was thrown beyond the fire. He spent one year in hospital and was released. My flight was frozen on the ground as were all others waiting to take off. Will never forget that tragedy.
04/18/2016 @ 15:57 [ref: 69586]
 Hugo Armand Ruiz
 Harrison, NY
I was a radio operator in VMR-252 stationed at Cherry Point, NC, from 1951-1954. While ferrying ROTC students from Corpus Christi to Norfolk we refueled at Whiting Field, Fl. For that lift we were two squadrons, VMR-252 and VMR-153. While taking off from Whiting one of ours went in just beyond the runway end. There were 42 students aboard from, I believe, the University of Oklahoma, all were killed. Of the five man crew there was only one survivor, the navigator named Jerry Tuttle, from upstate NY. He survived with two broken ankles and spent one year in hospital being subsequently released. I was in the fifth or sixth flight in the airlift and were frozen on the ground after the crash. There was no engine failure, as conveyed by the survivor, and the flight clipped trees upon take off and went in. Will never forget that event.
04/18/2016 @ 15:49 [ref: 69584]
 Hugo Armand Ruiz
 Harrison, NY
I was a radio operator in VMR-252 stationed at Cherry Point, NC, from 1951-1954. While ferrying ROTC students from Corpus Christi to Norfolk we refueled at Whiting Field, Fl. For that lift we were two squadrons, VMR-252 and VMR-153. While taking off from Whiting one of ours went in just beyond the runway end. There were 42 students aboard from, I believe, the University of Oklahoma, all were killed. Of the five man crew there was only one survivor, the navigator named Jerry Tuttle, from upstate NY. He survived with two broken ankles and spent one year in hospital being subsequently released. I was in the fifth or sixth flight in the airlift and were frozen on the ground after the crash. There was no engine failure, as conveyed by the survivor, and the flight clipped trees upon take off and went in. Will never forget that event.
04/18/2016 @ 15:49 [ref: 69585]
 Hugo Armand Ruiz
 Harrison, NY
I was a radio operator in VMR-252 stationed at Cherry Point, NC, from 1951-1954. While ferrying ROTC students from Corpus Christi to Norfolk we refueled at Whiting Field, Fl. For that lift we were two squadrons, VMR-252 and VMR-153. While taking off from Whiting one of ours went in just beyond the runway end. There were 42 students aboard from, I believe, the University of Oklahoma, all were killed. Of the five man crew there was only one survivor, the navigator named Jerry Tuttle, from upstate NY. He survived with two broken ankles and spent one year in hospital being subsequently released. I was in the fifth or sixth flight in the airlift and were frozen on the ground after the crash. There was no engine failure, as conveyed by the survivor, and the flight clipped trees upon take off and went in. Will never forget that event.
04/18/2016 @ 15:49 [ref: 69583]
 Hugo Armand Ruiz
 Harrison, NY
I was a radio operator in VMR-252 stationed at Cherry Point, NC, from 1951-1954. While ferrying ROTC students from Corpus Christi to Norfolk we refueled at Whiting Field, Fl. For that lift we were two squadrons, VMR-252 and VMR-153. While taking off from Whiting one of ours went in just beyond the runway end. There were 42 students aboard from, I believe, the University of Oklahoma, all were killed. Of the five man crew there was only one survivor, the navigator named Jerry Tuttle, from upstate NY. He survived with two broken ankles and spent one year in hospital being subsequently released. I was in the fifth or sixth flight in the airlift and were frozen on the ground after the crash. There was no engine failure, as conveyed by the survivor, and the flight clipped trees upon take off and went in. Will never forget that event.
04/18/2016 @ 15:49 [ref: 69582]
 Ray Payne
 Georgetown, TX
I was stationed at Cherry Point from Nov. 1956 until Dec.1958 and worked on the C-119's in the Sheet Metal shop. I flew many miles and hours in them. I remember them as being very noisy.
02/09/2016 @ 06:31 [ref: 69477]
 Richard Murphy
 Palm city, FL
Joan Darby Herrick writes of the March 6, 1959 crash of her husband's R4Q and mentions the only survivor was a Sgt Mauro. Today I attended Sgt Mauro's funeral. He recovered from the crash and was medically discharged in 1960. He was an air traffic control specialist and retired to Vero Beach, FL and died on December 31. 2015.
01/07/2016 @ 15:48 [ref: 69396]
 George Minze
 Jefferson city ., MO
I was a flight mech in Iwakuni when the Rq went down with all aboard,,,ironically the navigator was a Marine named Pete Whitehead.(spelling?)
Pete had been a pilot (army) in WW2 and was in a program to retrain pilots from other services for the Marines when the war ended most of those guys were given a enlisted rank..some were made navigators...Pet had flown over 26 missions as a pilot in a light bomber in the European theater...He was corporal in the Marines yet during the funeral at Iwakuni the reading of his medals took longer than the whole crew...Pete had been demoted for what was a case of not taking the Marine rules to seriously..He was older and well liked by us pups and the guys from WW2 and Korea.That crash stunned all of us crewmen that flew on the boxcars...


11/10/2014 @ 17:19 [ref: 68751]
 Robert M. Landess, Jr.
 Germantown, TN
My Father, Robert M. Landess, Sr. was in the VMR 252 R4-Q squadron in the late 1950,s ... I posted his picture in front of #671 taken in about 1960 on his last overseas tour ... does anyone remember him ??? ... he served as "Crew Chief" on the R4-Q and was in the return flight of aircraft during the 1959 crash just off base on final approach ... I have many fond memories of that aircraft ... my Father took me along on all the preflight checks and maintenance tune-ups ... I remember sitting in the co-pilot seat during engine warm-ups and system checks ... not sure it was allowed for me to be at the controls even though it on the ground and stationary ... what a hoot!!!
05/14/2014 @ 12:26 [ref: 68474]
 Joan Darby Chapin Herrick
 Merritt Island, FL

My first husband Bill Darby died on March 6, 1959 and my ex-husband Howard (Pappy) Chapin died on March 6, 2013. They had both been in VMGR 252. Pappy and I were divorced in the '70s and he married a girl named Joan.
Jim Clark mentions Capt. Galloway. I was at the Galloways home on NC base being consoled by Shirley. She called her husband and told him of the accident.
In spite of troubles,I enjoyed being a military wife. "The stroke of a pen": Congress later took away the DIC compensation I had been awarded even though at one point I was entitled to it and agreed to that instead of a lump sum.

03/09/2014 @ 15:41 [ref: 68410]

 

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