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Ryan PT-22 'Recruit'

Description
  Manufacturer:Ryan


  Base model:PT-22
  Designation:PT-22
  Nickname:Recruit
  Designation System:U.S. Air Force
  Designation Period:1925-1947
  Basic role:Primary Trainer
  Crew:Instructor & Student
 

Specifications
  Length: 22' 7" 6.8 m
  Height:7' 2" 2.1 m
  Wingspan: 30' 1" 9.1 m
  Gross Weight: 1,858 lb 843 kg
  Max Weight: 1,860 lb 843 kg

Propulsion
  No. of Engines: 1
  Powerplant: Kinner R-540-1
  Horsepower (each): 160

Performance
  Range: 205 miles 330 km
  Cruise Speed: 100 mph 161 km/h 87 kt
  Max Speed: 125 mph 201 km/h 108 kt
  Ceiling: 15,400 ft 4,693 m

Known serial numbers
41-15173 / 41-15745, 41-20591 / 41-21040

Examples of this type may be found at
MuseumCityState
Castle Air MuseumAtwaterCalifornia
Cavanaugh Flight MuseumAddisonTexas
Museum of AviationWarner Robins AFBGeorgia
Pima Air & Space MuseumTucsonArizona
San Diego Aerospace MuseumSan DiegoCalifornia
United States Air Force MuseumWright-PattersonOhio

PT-22 on display

Cavanaugh Flight Museum

Museum of Aviation

Pima Air & Space Museum

San Diego Aerospace Museum
 


 

Recent comments by our visitors
 Dan Collier
 Laughlin,, NV
Mr. Bud Revesz, you probably flew my PT-22 while at Dos Palos' Eagle Field, as this is where mine started her training career in 1942. Want to see what she looks like today? Go to youtube, then enter, dans pt22 and then click on the photo and a video will play for you. #156 was originally at Eagle Field before going on to Wickenburg, AZ, then Tucson, AZ for further training activites. I've owned 156 for 28 years as of the time of this posting. --Dan Collier
12/11/2013 @ 21:12 [ref: 68226]
 Mike Hovis
 Austin, TX
Added a photo of my grandfather Ray (below with the PT-22). I'm trying to figure out where he was when the pic was taken, there weren't too many options at that point (he enlisted in September of 1941 at Ft. Snelling, MN). He didn't make the cut (thankfully, otherwise I may not be here) and ended up an armament officer first for the 12 bombardment group, then the 376th.
05/17/2012 @ 11:22 [ref: 57443]
 Christopher
 Brea, CA
I am looking for a PT22 Ryan N57188 Serial Number 2057
I would like any info I can get. Thanks Christopher 562-824-8085
11/22/2010 @ 17:07 [ref: 33342]
 Charles Wigginsw
 Liberty, TX
I bought a PT-22 as a basket case for $500 in 1971. I discoverd John Gotchoff of Santa Paula, California, who worked on PT-22s exclusively. It was shipped to him and a year later he delivered it back to me newly rebuilt. The original placard stated it was accepted by the US Army Air Corps on 1 December 1941. I flew it for several years and had a great time. My friends always worried about me flying the PT-22 because they could hear the irregular beat of the Kinner radial engine and thought I was having engine problems. It ran perfectly but due to the short exhaust stacks and the heat muff, it seemed to be missing from the ground. It did demand careful attention to airspeed on landing. The best way to make a smooth landing was to wheel if on with the main gear, keeping the tail up until it slowed to a roll.
11/07/2010 @ 20:33 [ref: 33013]
 Paula
 , NC
I had to laugh when I saw the post about Charlie Lohr and the Ryan PT22. He was my grandfather and, while he passed away before I was born, I have heard all of the stories of his escapades! I have a picture of that plane!!
08/24/2010 @ 08:22 [ref: 29352]
 Gene Ogden
 Mount Vernon, WA
I had occasion to fly in a PT-22 in 1957 in Moses Lake WA. I was only a passenger. We did two loops with the second one resulting in an inverted flat spin. We pulled out at about 600'. I never flew in it again! My friend was killed in it with the classic stall spin turning to final. You have to respect it as many people have said, or it will bite you.
08/15/2010 @ 19:22 [ref: 29015]
 Tom Snider
 Southmont, NC
Yes, My first aircraft ride was in a pt22 at the old Grubb Airport in Lexington,N.C., at the age of 16. Charlie lohr of Lex. was the pilot. He done everything that was possible to be done in a pt22 and sceared the living hell out of me. Robert Phillips owen the plane later, and if you could find this same plane, you will find my finger prints on the back side of the inst. panel. AS they told me betore flight-Do Not Touch Anything. I still fly and I think that the Pt22 was an encouragement. At air shows I go to I Always look for a Rayn 22.
06/09/2009 @ 14:18 [ref: 24227]
 R.W.\"Bob\"Caldwell
 St Pete,FL,33707, FL
Right after WW2 ,afriend and I decided to buy an airplane.We were both aeronaautical engineers, working at Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corp.(builders of the B24 Liberator) in San Diego.Thousands of surplus airplanes were available, including primary trainers such as Stearmans,Fairchilds andRyan PT-22's. We looked at several hundred at Hemet,CA,still owned by the gov't. but were offered one owned by a test pilot at Convair,priced as were the gov't owned ones , at $875. Many modifications were required,to license them as a civilian aircraft. I bought out my partner,and worked many nights,weekends ,and vacations to recover and modify the airplane,under an A&E mechanic. We towed it to an airport,and I learned to fly under a WW2 instructor.
Then I got married!!!!
The two of us tooled all over southern CA, with reckless abandon, 'til my wife got pregnant. An aborted trip to Big Bear airport,facing fierce SantaAna downdrafts,convinced us that it was time to sell the airplane.I delivered it to a young marine at Barstow airport for $!500.And returned to my home in La Jolla, CA. That was 1947.
02/21/2009 @ 04:50 [ref: 23783]
 R.W.\"Bob\"Caldwell
 St Pete,FL,33707, FL
Right after WW2 ,afriend and I decided to buy an airplane.We were both aeronaautical engineers, working at Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corp.(builders of the B24 Liberator) in San Diego.Thousands of surplus airplanes were available, including primary trainers such as Stearmans,Fairchilds andRyan PT-22's. We looked at several hundred at Hemet,CA,still owned by the gov't. but were offered one owned by a test pilot at Convair,priced as were the gov't owned ones , at $875. Many modifications were required,to license them as a civilian aircraft. I bought out my partner,and worked many nights,weekends ,and vacations to recover and modify the airplane,under an A&E mechanic. We towed it to an airport,and I learned to fly under a WW2 instructor.
Then I got married!!!!
The two of us tooled all over southern CA, with reckless abandon, 'til my wife got pregnant. An aborted trip to Big Bear airport,facing fierce SantaAna downdrafts,convinced us that it was time to sell the airplane.I delivered it to a young marine at Barstow airport for $!500.And returned to my home in La Jolla, CA. That was 1947.
02/21/2009 @ 04:49 [ref: 23782]
 R.W.\"Bob\"Caldwell
 St Pete,FL,33707, FL
Right after WW2 ,afriend and I decided to buy an airplane.We were both aeronaautical engineers, working at Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corp.(builders of the B24 Liberator) in San Diego.Thousands of surplus airplanes were available, including primary trainers such as Stearmans,Fairchilds andRyan PT-22's. We looked at several hundred at Hemet,CA,still owned by the gov't. but were offered one owned by a test pilot at Convair,priced as were the gov't owned ones , at $875. Many modifications were required,to license them as a civilian aircraft. I bought out my partner,and worked many nights,weekends ,and vacations to recover and modify the airplane,under an A&E mechanic. We towed it to an airport,and I learned to fly under a WW2 instructor.
Then I got married!!!!
The two of us tooled all over southern CA, with reckless abandon, 'til my wife got pregnant. An aborted trip to Big Bear airport,facing fierce SantaAna downdrafts,convinced us that it was time to sell the airplane.I delivered it to a young marine at Barstow airport for $!500.And returned to my home in La Jolla, CA. That was 1947.
02/21/2009 @ 04:49 [ref: 23781]

 

Recent photos uploaded by our visitors